Home » Camcorders » Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom
Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom


Product Added : February 16th, 2013
Category : Camcorders

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Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom


Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

Canon VIXIA HV30 High-Definition MiniDV Camcorder

  • Capture high-defintion video to MiniDV
  • 10x optical zoom; SuperRange Optical Image Stabilizer
  • 24p Cinema Mode; 30p Progressive Mode
  • 2.7-inch widescreen Multi-Angle Vivid LCD
  • Simultaneous photo capture

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What customers say about Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom?

  1. 164 of 168 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Great image, poor “feel” in your hand, May 23, 2008
    By 
    Robert Cozzi (North Aurora, IL USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Electronics)

    I’ve used higher-end ProSumer camcorders for a while and virtually every other generation of video camcorder since 1980. I recently used a Sony HC3 HDV handheld but gave that to my daughter when I got this HV30.

    The HV30 has a great picture and all that. So I think I’ll focus on what’s either really cool, or a bit off-putting for a buyer.

    Really Cool:
    Video quality is the best you can find on today’s one-chip HDV camera. Some 3-chip cameras have a better color depth but many 3-chip cameras actually have a worse picture. They did a great job.

    It plays other Canon HDV tape. I own and use a XH A1 3-CCD canon HDV camera and the HV30 plays its tapes even better than the XHA1 seems to. That’s great because I can save the A1′s guts for a few more years.

    It has virtually every output port you could wish for (today). HDMI, Component (yes Component!), Composite, USB and Firewire. Its very complete.

    It worked with Apple FinalCut Pro without any trouble. I can’t even get he XHA1 to work with it without screwing around with it for a while.

    It has a mic input jack which Podcasters love, but I and other have been having trouble with it. I believe Canon didn’t make a simple mic jack but some kind of phantom powered mic this or that, which hobbyist would not really use. So to make it work, and this is the tip, you have to go into the menu and turn on an option, then go into a different menu and adjust the gain and/or volume. Oops, maybe this should be a “not so cool” item.

    The Not so Cool.

    The ergonomics are poor. My hand doesn’t feel comfortable holding it no matter how I adjust the hand strap. I’ve never had this issue with any other camera.

    The Record start/stop button is in the wrong location. They put their goofy “joy stick” right where a person’s thumb falls while holding the camera, so you’re instinctively pushing on the joystick instead of the start/stop button while filming. The worse part, the Joystick is really crap as an interface element.

    Noisy camera. The camera makes noise when you move it (shake it) it makes noise when you zoom and it makes a ton of noise when you insert or eject a tape.

    Poor image when filming motion. If you’re filming a scene and you move the camera, you are going to get streaking of the image. Why? I believe/assume its because unlike Canon’s great D-SLR cameras in low light, their video equipment doesn’t have the lower ISO (low light) capability that Sony’s or everyone else has. Not sure why, but it seems to be a consistent theme with Canon. Fortunately it has a built-in light useful for those birthday parties but not much else.

    The Bottom Line

    For the under $800 it costs, its worth it if you’re filming your vacations, holidays, birthdays and whatnot.

    If you’re a podcaster and want something with every connection known to man, its more than worth it for the HDMI and mic jacks alone.

    If you wish you could afford the Canon XH A1 or better and want nearly as good a picture, this is the camera for you.

    If you simply want a tape drive for your XH A1, this is actually cheaper than a commercial CANON HDV tape drive.

    The bottom, bottom line is Sony had lost its way and CANON’s HV30 is the current champ in the hand-held HDV camcorder race. I like sony better, but I don’t like getting nickeled and dimed to death. You buy the Canon HV30 and you’ll be happy with the results.

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  2. 178 of 184 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    It was a hard decision, but I’m happy., June 16, 2008
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Electronics)

    Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

    I’m very happy with my Canon HV30. I rate the picture quality, color quality, low-light ability, white balance all excellent. The zoom control is a little close for my fingers and I found myself holding the camera less firmly (ie with the tips of my fingers rather than my whole hand) which would be wearisome on a long shoot, but tripods are still the best way to shoot video for steady pictures. On the other hand the anti-vibration correction seems to help a lot.

    The total package is good, not excellent and includes a battery with a nice contact protector that doesn’t look like it will fall off (unlike the protector plate on the Elura and Optura that has to be taped on because it is so loose.) The plate keeps the battery from discharging on the keys in your pocket or bag. It also includes a charger which will also operate the camera without the battery, which is very handy. This is only good, because it won’t charge the battery unless it is in the camera, so you can’t charge while shooting with another battery.

    The package also includes a remote control (see above) that frustrated me the first time I used it and seems to be of marginal utility. However, all of the minor problems with the package can be remedied with an add-on accessory. The camera is what does the work and it is excellent.

    I’ve had this camcorder only one week. It was a busy week with kids graduation and parties and night club rock concerts on the video agenda but I learned a lot shopping for this camera and using it all week, so maybe my story will help you.

    First, why miniDV rather than flash, hard disk or dvd? I already have two mini dv cameras, a Canon Optura and an Elura. These have given me good service and images that were the envy of my Sony, Samsung, and Panasonic-owning friends. The only brand I compare to Canon is Sony (for similar consumer equipment). I rejected the flash and DVD models because the recording time is too short. DVD, in particular, is a rip-off with just 15 minutes for a $10 disk.

    This kind of short recording time is OK if what you want is to capture 1 or 2 minutes of magic moments and have them immediately available to put in a player. Personally I find the tape just as good for instant replay on the built-in video screen. It takes a couple minutes longer to rewind the tape.

    The hard drive models have a recording time advantage that initially attracted me, but the transfer issue is what made me decide to stay with a minidv. Ultimately all video has to be transfered to another medium to be used and archived. I have been transfering my minidv tapes to computer hard drives and dvd for years.

    Transfer is a tediuos, time-eating process that has caused me to spend more upgrading my computer and software than I spent on the cameras. Yes, I can make DVDs with my video; I can make YouTube videos; and I can put my own video stuff on my iPod and Zune. But it takes a lot of time to get the results I want.

    Why tape? It’s cheap and convenient. Video takes a lot of disk space to store the original and then to edit and render into other formats. I buy the cheap tapes but I only record them once. I can carry 2 or 3 which give me 2 or 3 hours recording time. The real restraint is the batteries. Once I have the image on tape I don’t erase it. I can play it immediately if I want to, but the ultimate goal is to transfer it to hard disk for editing and archiving. The real godsend is the recent plethora of cheap 500 GB (now 750 and soon 1TB) external USB hard drives. The transfer time is a chore; so is the indexing.

    Tape is patient. I can do it on my schedule. With a hard disk, it can get full at a time that is inconvenient to transfer but I need to do some more shooting. Then I would have to consider the dreaded DELETE of something I shot. With tape I can postphone transfering and editing for months without impairing my camera readiness. After I transfer, I still have the tape.

    I considered the Sony HDR-HC9 and the older Canon HV20 vs. the Canon HV30. I was tempted by the 6MP in the Sony and also by the low prices on the HV20. I saw a deal on an HV20 for $520 but it was gone before I made up my mind to settle for it. Ultimately I was looking at $999 for the Sony or $771 for the Canon. The HV30 had 30p mode and the $228 savings provided a budget for extra batteries and other goodies.

    So am I happy? Yes.

    My wife used it at my kids’ graduation. Perfect color and detail, oohs and ahs from everybody. My wife just uses automatic mode with the lcd screen hanging out. I took some mobile shots in my car, one-handed through the windshield. The anti-vibration mode…

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  3. 156 of 161 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great camcorder!, April 1, 2008
    By 
    Michael Chung (Houston, TX) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Canon VIXIA HV30 MiniDV High Definition Camcorder with 10x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Electronics)

    I’ve had the HV30 for about 1 week now, and so far I think it’s great.
    I previously used the Sony TRV38, another very capable camcorder. The HV30 comes in a slick, black color and is slightly smaller than my Sony TRV38.

    I have three young kids, so I take tons of video mostly indoors. The HV30 has very good low light capability. There’s some grain in the darker videos, and the shutter speed also slows (you can see the stuttering movement in the video when taking in very low light). However, you can still see faces clearly. One cool thing I like about this camera is that it has a manual controlled LED light that can add about 3 feet of light when it’s too dark. Sony has that 0 lux Night Shot that works in complete darkness, but the colors change to green and black and makes the eyes look scary. I prefer the LED light feature on the HV30 over Sony’s Night Shot.

    You can select from 5 different shooting modes:
    1. DV (regular)
    2. DV (wide screen)
    3. HDV (high definition – wide screen by default)
    4. HDV 24P (cinema mode)
    5. HDV 30P (progressive mode)

    Although I don’t have a high definition TV yet, the colors in every mode looked great on my regular TV. The 24P and 30P modes give the video a “movie look and feel” (thus the name cinema mode), and this is cool just to have. I look forward to shooting something all in 24P or 30P and showing the DVD to family/friends. I’m sure they’ll be amazed that my home videos don’t “look” like home videos…..and this is all due to the camcorder modes.

    You can take photos using the HV30 (saves onto mini SD card). You can use the camcorder as a stand-alone digital camera (3 megapixels), and there’s even a flash on the camcorder for the digital camera. You can also take still photos while you’re recording video. I use this to take photos while recording only because it’s a nice little extra thing to have. The pictures are not all that great but not bad either. It’s definitely a bonus that both video and still pictures are built into this one camera. I would still recommend a dedicated digital camera to take better quality still photos.

    I backup all my videos to DVD because it’s easier to watch that way. I prefer the miniDV tapes because it stores “pure” video and information like the time and date. I just started doing a little video editing using Sony Vegas software….and that seems to be a nice software package. The final video on the resulting DVD looks great.

    I thought I would stick with Sony products, but so far I am enjoying the Canon HV30 and have no regrets.

    I will probably be adding more to this review as I use the camera more.

    Update April 7, 2008
    Still liking the camcorder because of the 24P and 30P modes. You can really see that difference in the images compared to regular mode. Your video editing software must support HDV (high definition video) in order for you to edit any high definition stuff. Sony Vegas Movie Studio doesn’t have it, but the Vegas Movie Studio Platinum edition DOES have it. Make sure to buy the right software if you’re going to do editing.

    I noticed that the sound is a little soft. Maybe there’s a setting for this, but another possible reason is that the Canon’s HV30′s microphones are on the top of the camcorder facing up compared the my Sony TRV38′s microphones on the front facing forward. This does not bother me too much.

    There’s an automatic lens cap which makes protecting the lens very convenient. No more fussing with a lens cap or having it dangle in your videos.

    The package does not include a neck strap…you would think Canon would throw in a strap for a $900 camcorder. I bought a regular Canon strap at a local shop for $18. I think this is worth to have to keep the camcorder secure.

    The battery is a cheap one and keeps a charge for about an hour or less. Since a miniDV tape is 1 hour, it would be prudent to get a better battery just to be safe. Canon makes an extended battery for about $60.

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