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Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder

Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder
Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder


Product Added : March 20th, 2013
Category : Camcorders

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Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder


Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder

The Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder has dual lenses and twin Full HD 3MOS imagers and as such it joins a burgeoning class of affordable, single-body 3D-capable handheld camcorders. But it introduces to this category those three-chip imagers and also true convergence adjustment, which alters the angular orientation of the two 10x zoom lenses. This control facilitates fine control over the location of the “image plane” – the plane from which objects seem to either jump or recede as you’re watching them on the big screen, or on the Z10000 camcorder’s glasses-free 3.2″ LCD monitor.Convergence can be set to adjust automatically, or you can turn a manual dial to make the lenses’ sights diverge or move toward parallel. The lenses shoot fairly wide at a 35mm equivalent of 32mm when in 3D mode, which gives more options for placing foreground/background elements in a 3D scene or for shooting indoors. For close-ups, the minimum object distance is also quite impressive for a 3D came

  • Professional-Quality Full HD 2D and Full HD 3D Images: The Double 3MOS System reflects the sum of a number of unique technologies that Panasonic has accumulated
  • High-Sensitivity 3MOS Sensor: The HDC-Z10000 employs two independent, high-sensitivity 3MOS sensors, left and right, each with a three-sensor configuration
  • Crystal Engine Pro II Chip for Enhanced Resolution and Noise Reduction: The ultra-high-speed Crystal Engine Pro II processes the 4K2K-equivalent pixels that are obtained and with pixel shift technology, superb Full-HD image quality is achieved even in detailed images
  • Bright, High-Performance f/1.5 Lens with Nano Surface Coating: New large-diameter f/1.5 lenses are mounted independently, left and right. A Nano Surface Coating is applied to the front lens surface
  • AVCHD Progressive-Compliant 1080p60 Recording: 1080p60 recording (1920 x 1080, 60 progressive frames per second) conveys about twice the information of 1080i (interlace) recording. Fast-moving subjects, such as in sports scenes, are recorded smoothly

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What customers say about Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder?

  1. 15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Panasonic z10000 first thoughts…, December 13, 2011
    By 
    Gm (Arlington, MA United States) –
    This review is from: Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder (Electronics)

    I’ve been using the z10000 for about two weeks now. Since I’m the first reviewer of this camera I’m just going to lay out my thoughts about this camera without really polishing or organizing my review.

    I was expecting professional level quality and features from this camera, and I feel that it comes up a bit short in both. I’m purposely being very critical of this camera because of the very high price tag. As the price of a device goes up so do my expectations and there are currently two other good 3d video cameras (JVC 3D Full HD Camera, Sony HDR-TD10 High Definition 3D Handycam Camcorder with 10x Optical Zoom (Dark Gray)) that cost less than half as much as the Panasonic z10000. Overall I’d say it is hard to justify the high cost of this camera compared to the alternatives.

    Why is 3d video so attractive to me in the first place? Years ago I remember many people seeing ultra high definition displays for the first time and remarking that it was “like looking through a window”. The displays were very nice compared to standard televisions at the time, but I never felt that the view was as realistic as looking out of a window. Even with a large 1080p display its just a very clear moving picture. A few years ago I started to see 3d displays appear. Finally, it was like looking at a scene through a window. I have mixed feelings about watching a movie in 3d, but for home videos you can’t beat the realism. It really is like looking through a window to the past.

    I got into the 3d game a year ago with the Fujifilm FinePix Real 3D W3 Digital Camera with 3.5-Inch LCD. Its been a lot of fun to use, but let’s be honest – the quality of the still imaging is poor and the video is awful. This year I bought the JVC 3D Full HD Camera, but only held onto it for a few weeks before returning it since I had no easy way of playing back the high quality 3d video aside from using the camera.

    One of the big pluses to the z10000 is that the video can be edited using Vegas 11, which I already owned. I have NOT tried the bundled software with the z10000, but I believe it will also allow you to burn Blu-Ray discs with your video.

    The video quality is great with good lighting, but it struggles in low light conditions more than I believe a pro-level camera should. I did side by side recordings with my 6 year old Sony HDR-FX1 3-CCD HDV High Definition Camcorder w/12x Optical Zoom and the difference in quality is obvious.

    I am impressed with the sound on this camera. It provides 5.1 recording, and I’ve tried it out in a variety of settings. It is very nice when I play back my video to hear voices coming from the appropriate locations. If I talk when holding the camera my voice will dominate all channels, but that was expected.

    I am very impressed with the image stabilization this camera provides. When you move the camera around a scene there is the usual delay before it starts to sweep the scene, but I do not get any jerkiness or momentary blur as I have with other cameras.

    The view screen does not flip out like on many pro cameras. This one actually pulls out of the camera and turns up. Forget about quick access to the camera – you’ll waste precious seconds popping out the view screen and turning it up each time you want to start filming.

    Battery life is short. I have not run the camera until the battery dies, but the power indicator shows low after about 60 minutes of recording. The cost of additional batteries is very high, and the AC power port is located behind the battery. This is a very strange design choice as it means I have to pull out the battery any time I want to switch to external power. It also means I can’t charge the battery when its in the camera. I’ll have to carry the battery charger with me when I travel, and it does not utilize the same power cord that the camera does.

    Out of all of the buttons available on the camera you would think one of the most important would be the one that allows you to switch between 2d and 3d recording. Oddly enough this button does not exist, and you cannot program it into any of the user defined buttons. To switch between 2d/3d you…

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  2. 5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Just in Time Films vs Z10000, February 2, 2012
    By 
    Chad Thomas “JET” (Louisville, KY) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder (Electronics)

    The Z10000 is a mixed bag that, for me, is an essential tool anyway. When I started down this 3D path two years ago, there were no integrated 3D cameras on the market. In May 2011, I bought Sony’s HDR-TD10, a Handicam that had a single manual dial to control every manual function available (and there weren’t that many – shutter speed and framerate were fixed in 3D mode). Now there’s a reasonably priced integrated 3D cameras with a host of manual controls and customizable features. And it takes excellent pictures in bright light. But low-light performance is poor and some of the most important features are frustratingly implemented. But while those would be nice enhancements, they are not essential. The primary selling point of this camera is the promise of a better affordable 3D camera, and it delivers. It is the best 3D camera you can buy for under $15,000. No competitors were announced at CES 2012, so it is the tool of choice for budding stererographers for the near future.

    See my full review on the Just in Time Films website.

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  3. 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Nice tool with problems, January 20, 2013
    By 
    Sergey G. Ivanchenkov “surge001″ (Jacksonville, FL) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Panasonic HDC-Z10000 Twin-Lens 2D/3D Camcorder (Electronics)

    Greetings, my fellow 3D thrills seekers! I’ve had my Panasonic HDC-Z10000 camera for a year now, and used at a lot in various settings, so I’ve got some real experiences to share. First off, I must make a disclaimer: I like this camera; I think it is a useful tool in a video enthusiast’s arsenal, and I am keeping mine for good. But it is not so rosy too: the camera has a lot of frustrating issues which are hard to oversee, even if you try hard. There are so many of those that I doubt any serious professional would ever make this camera his or her A-tool. That said I would not position Z10K as “professional”, in spite of some existing pretense out there. Having XLR audio inputs with phantom power does not automatically qualify for professional camcorder. Let us start looking at this camcorder strengths and weaknesses now.

    The camera has total of 6 CMOS sensors, or double 3MOS, which helps making beautiful bright and colorful pictures in adequate lighting conditions, but the grim truth is that those sensors are very small: 1/4.1 inch each. While this is not necessarily synonymous to poor quality, and my previous remark is my acknowledgement for this, but there are still some bad implications exist. I am not going to refer to any scientific analysis, you can do the research yourself, but in my own observation, such small size of the sensors contributes to quite poor low light performance. No matter how much you try tweaking color profiles, the picture comes out very noisy, beyond any acceptable level. Additionally, even with hefty 1.5 f-stop lens, such small sensors make hard getting ever-so-sought bokeh effect indeed. You may try hard, but it will elude you, be assured. Obviously, there is a flip side to the coin: your depth of focus gets wide, which in many cases is desired and helpful in some specific applications, but let’s not forget that your creativity is still quite limited, when you need it.

    White balance control cannot be any worse too. There is one push button which you use to change the mode as well as for assigning custom balance. Therefore, if you wish to go from only two of the existing temperature presets or from automatic to custom white balance setting, you have to keep pushing it to cycle through all of the existing options until you find one desired. This is very inconvenient while shooting indoors when color condition changes from take to take. Sure, you can use neutral gray reference card each time and keep your setting on custom all the time, but this is not that simplistic too. Due to small sensor size, the dynamic range is not very wide; therefore environment color and attached on-camera light color become significantly different. If you turn the light off and set custom white balance to match environment color, than turning on-camera light on would throw the color badly off balance and ruin the shot. If on the other hand, you use neutral gray card to adjust for on-camera light, than the environment color becomes significantly misbalanced. As a way of mitigating the problem, I found by trial and error that turning camera to auto balance for a few seconds, and then locking auto-tuned setting would do the trick acceptably. But since there is only one button for controlling every aspect of white balance, you have to keep cycling the options over and over again just to engage auto balance and then lock it. Very annoying and time consuming, which in many cases make you miss the shot too. I doubt one do-it-all button would be professional’s choice. My other camera Canon XH-A1 for instance, has by far, far better white balance control with several dedicated hard buttons and a dial on camera body. This is where Panasonic should get their ideas if their own ones are missing. Not such professional level at all.

    Next, the lens: yes, it is F1.5 which Panasonic is so proudly bragging about, but f1.5 on such small lens diameter is not a big deal really. Since the opening is so small, there is small amount of light which can get through. This, coupled with small sensor size, explains so poor low light handling. But things get even worse: since there are two of those sitting next to each other, Panasonic chose to cover them with oval shaped glass of who knows what quality, which is housed in oval hood. If you think this was a good idea, think again: there simply are no oval shaped lens filters in this universe. If there was no glass cover, and each lens had its own filter threads, you could at least buy two filters and put them on each lens individually; but no, this won’t happen. This camera is completely filter-prohibitive. That is very bad because there are a lot of situations, when circular polarizer for instance, helps recovering otherwise ruined shot perspective by removing glare, water reflection, or unbalanced white sand or concrete shine, etc. With my mentioned Canon, none of this is an issue: I got a whole selection of B&W lens filters, one for each specific…

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