Home » Digital SLR Cameras » Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens

Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens

Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens
Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens


Product Added : March 1st, 2013
Category : Digital SLR Cameras

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Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens


Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens

The EOS 7D features a Canon-designed 18.0-megapixel APS-C size CMOS sensor that captures such a high level of resolution it’s easy to crop images for enlargement without concern of losing detail. A major factor in reducing noise, the CMOS sensor assures that images shot at highest sensitivity will be remarkably smooth. Dual DIGIC 4 Image Processors ensure that images are captured, processed and saved with remarkable speed. The EOS 7D’s ability to capture and process data of images shot at 18.0 Megapixels at 8 fps, as well as Face Detection Live Mode, Full HD video recording, Auto Lighting Optimizer and Lens Peripheral optimization are all possible thanks to the Dual DIGIC 4 Image Processors.

  • 18.0-megapixel CMOS Sensor and Dual DIGIC 4 Image Processors for high image quality and speed with 3 Inch LCD display
  • Kit includes 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM standard zoom lens; Accessories- EOS 7D Digital SLR Body; Eyecup EG; Wide Neck strap EW-EOS7D; Stereo AV Cable; USB Interface Cable IFC-200U; Battery Pack LP-E6; Battery Charger LC-E6; EOS Digital Solution Disk; Great Photography is Easy Booklet and “Do more with Micro” Booklet; Software Instruction Manual.
  • Advanced HD movie mode with manual exposure control and selectable frame rates
  • Intelligent Viewfinder with 100 percent field of view; 19-point, all cross-type AF system equipped with dual diagonal cross-type sensors
  • Capture images to CF Card Type I and II, UDMA-compliant CF cards (not included)

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What customers say about Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens?

  1. 634 of 646 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    A seriously capable and enjoyable camera., December 7, 2009
    By 
    Anthony Pantliano “The Photo Guy” (New York State) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens (Camera)

    (I’m putting a quick update at the top, for those who don’t get a chance to read all the way through. As of 10/15/2012 my 7D is still working perfectly, and only has slight cosmetic wear on the mode dial, where the rubberized coating is coming off. The camera is about 3 years old at this point.)

    The Canon EOS 7D is Canon’s semi-pro / enthusiast digital crop sensor SLR. It’s a terrific SLR that shines in photo quality, control placement, speed, and viewfinder size and coverage.

    First, let me tell you a little about myself so you can gauge what my expectations for the camera are. I’m strictly a hobbyist photographer and use my camera a couple of times a month at museums, outdoor parks, and vacations. Besides photos of my dog, my photography consists primarily of static subjects. This is my second SLR.

    Enough of me, onto the camera. The 7D is a fairly bulky SLR and dwarfs “entry level” models such as the Olympus E-510 (see my photos), though it’s no bigger than Nikon’s D300s. With that said, it’s not uncomfortably large and is easy enough to carry around all day. Build quality is terrific and the camera has a solid, luxury feel to it. The 7D fits very well into my average sized hands and, with the kit 28-135 lens, is nicely balanced. All the buttons are easy to reach and, if you’ve used a Canon camera before, easy to figure out. The magnesium body is sealed against moisture and dust. The shutter button is well placed and has a nicely defined halfway point. A control dial is on the back of the camera and behind the shutter button too. There is also a joystick-like toggle on the back of the camera as well.

    A large (3″) and high-resolution (920,000 pixel) screen is on the camera back with a secondary status LCD display on the top (with backlight). The screen is a pleasure to use when reviewing images for focus, and when manually focusing in magnified live view mode. Compared to the 3-inch 420,000-pixel screen on my Panasonic LX3 it’s a definite upgrade, and makes a noticeable difference.

    The viewfinder is huge and bright and has 100% coverage. Coming from the Olympus, which has a very cramped and tunnel-like viewfinder, it was a revelation, and was one of the reasons I decided to step up to the 7D. Also, by using a transmissive LCD on the viewfinder the only markings you see until you confirm focus are for the selected focus method (for instance, a single box when using one focus point, or brackets when using the auto select autofocus method). Moreover, a composition grid can be imposed on the viewfinder. The information display on the bottom of the viewfinder is large and bright and contains lots of shooting and camera information.

    The camera is very responsive and turns on almost instantly. The sensor cleaning occurs when you turn the camera on or off but can be interrupted during power up. Focus speeds with the kit lens are very speedy, even in dim light (two 40 watt lamps and a television as the only light sources in a 17′ x 11′ room). The 19-point all cross type autofocus is uncanny at picking the correct subject. If it doesn’t get it right the first time it will the second. I usually set all my cameras to center point autofocus, but the 7D does a great job picking out the subject, so I leave it on fully automatic mode (unless I’m using the 50mm f/1.4 lens, since wide aperture lenses like that can focus shift with such a shallow depth of field). Live view focusing is not a quick, especially in low light, and I only use live view when I need to shoot at a weird angle and I can’t shoot looking through the viewfinder. Live view can be used with a mirror flip or contrast detection. The contrast detection mode is fairly pokey, while the mirror flip mode is quicker, but introduces a brief break in the view. Continuous shooting is available in both a high and a low setting. High is 8 FPS, while the low speed is 3 FPS. The shutter sound is nicely subdued and not nearly as noisy as the Olympus’ is.

    Photo quality is terrific. There are various Picture Styles you can choose to alter the contrast, sharpness, color tone, and saturation of the photos. At any rate, 99% of the time, colors are natural, exposure is accurate, and dynamic range is great. At this level of camera, that’s expected though. What I really love about the 7D is the high ISO noise, or lack thereof. The luxury of feeling confident while shooting at high ISO is priceless. I’ve taken a good number of shots as high as ISO 3200 and have no complaints. Of course there is a bit of noise, and the mushiness that noise reduction brings, but for an 18 MP image at ISO 3200, I have no complaints. The ISO speeds above 3200 are OK as well, but I’ll reserve those for emergency use only, they get fairly processed looking. (Updating this section a bit: Since the 7D is over 3 years old at this point its high ISO shooting is not as good as it once was…

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  2. 1,198 of 1,239 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Does the 7D beat full frame cameras?, October 13, 2009
    By 
    Abdulrahman Aljabri (Jeddah) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    No, but it’s so good that one starts to contemplate this question, which was never the case before the 7D was introduced. Both systems, crop and full frame, have their pros and cons and place in photography. But before I get into that let me say I have not been as excited about a camera since the introduction of the 5D MK I four years ago. That’s because the 7D raises the crop camera bar to the point where crop users will not feel at a disadvantage to full frame camera users, especially if coupled with awesome ef-s lenses such as the 17-55 f2.8.

    How so? The 7D sets a new standard in four major ways.

    1. It produces whopping 18MP pictures, which are just 3MP shy of the current top of the line full frame Canon cameras. Just few years ago most pros were producing stellar results using the 1Ds MKII 16MP camera. Now you have more MPs in a crop sensor, that’s a major achievement. This achievement translates into bigger prints and, perhaps more importantly, cropping power. Out shooting wildlife with a 300mm instead of 400mm? You can crop the 7D files down to 50% of their original file size and still obtain sharp pictures. It’s just not that easy with the 1D MK III 10MP files.

    2. Many worried that extra MPs in small crop sensors would translate into nosier pictures, but the amazing thing is that this camera produces images with what seems to be less noise than the 1Ds MKII. The noise level is very good. At ISO 1600 I still prefer pictures coming from my 5D MKII, but below ISO1600 they are very close. Frankly, I can go with either camera because most of my professionally shot portraits and product pictures are shot at ISO100. At ISO100 both produce very clean files and are practically indistinguishable.

    3. Focus is the one area that was lacking on the previous 1.6 crop Canon cameras and this camera changes that. It’s not a 1D in focus speed and accuracy, but it’s the next best thing compared to them. It’s faster than the Canon 5D MKII, which is known to be slightly faster or around the focus performance range of the 50D and 40D.

    4. The drive chain is fast, so fast it’s beyond anything I needed in my professional work in portrait, commercial, and product photography. Going through pictures taken at 8fps produces very little difference from frame to frame. One probably has to shoot a very fast moving subject/object to see the advantage of such fast drive system.

    There are obviously many other things that I have not covered in this review. But based on the above, all I can say is that this camera has really raised the bar for all cameras and made it much more affordable to obtain a professional level camera for all types of photography. If you were considering buying the 5D MKII as an upgrade give this camera a test because it might be all you need.

    As for the advantages of crop cameras I always find it odd that casual users who shoot many things but focus on landscape think they need a full frame to realize their potential. Crop cameras such as the 7D and 50D are fine for most users and offer many advantages including:

    1. greater depth of field at lower aperture for landscape photography

    2. greater tilt and shift effect because of sensor size relative to effect (8mm in shift is greater in effect relative to a 22mm sensor compared to a 35mm sensor)

    3. greater magnification with micro lenses and extension tubes because of smaller sensor (1:1 in full frame equals 35mm, 1:1 in crop equals 22mm)

    4. smaller lighter lenses with wider aperture that achieve greater reach (such as the 17-55 2.8 vs the 24-70 2.8 similar reach but much lighter and smaller)

    Traditionally the three areas full frame cameras outshine crop cameras are a bigger brighter viewfinder, shallower depth of field for portrait photography, and better ISO performance, which on the last point the 7D has proven not be an issue anymore.
    And for the second point really, most beautiful low depth of field portraits are done around f2.8-2.0 in full frame (going wider will make depth of field too narrow to place two eyes in focus). Hence, if one is using a wide prime, a crop sensor will produce the same depth of field at 2.0-1.4. Considering an affordable 50mm f1.4 lens on crop has the same field of view as 85mm lens on full frame there is really no reason to discount a crop camera any more as the 7D levels the playing field.

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  3. 491 of 513 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Canon EOS 7D, October 14, 2009
    By 
    Richard (Alhambra, CA) –

    Well after much deliberation between this and a 5d Mark II i decided to opt for the 7D and spend the extra I save on some nice wide angle lenses. First of all for anyone who is expecting a 1.6 crop camera’s image quality to be better than the 5d mark ii you can forget it. The 5D mark ii is a full frame sensor camera and the 7D is a crop, different cameras for different purposes. I know three people who own a 5d mark II, wedding photographer, cinematographer and a landscape photographer. As you can tell, they all need wide angle and good low light performance. The 5D Mark II/other full frame cameras are targeted towards users with wide angle needs. So if you find yourself in a crowded room with little light during a wedding the EOS 7D may not be for you, less you put on a 10-22mm EFS lens which is the widest Canon Zoom Lens for a APS-C camera. (Or 8-15 F4L Fisheye).

    Image Quality from this camera is amazing, I’ll put up some pictures once it stops raining where I live. Detail is very good, and the 28-135 lens accommodates this cameras ability very nicely, however, starting off at 28mm will probably be too long for most people in everyday situations such as those for street photographers. Picking up a 17-55 2.8 lens will probably be highly recommended by many.

    Build Quality is superb. This “tank” of a camera is no light weight and one of the first things you notice when you pick up the camera is the hefty feel you get. Very ergonomic grip and a robust feel all around. Don’t expect to have it hanging around your next too long though. Weather seals are improved and you can notice that the area above the viewfinder is much larger thanks to a 100% coverage pentaprism.

    Autofocusing, now I’ve read some issues about the 7D’s new focusing system such as softness from auto zone focusing and I am also getting some mixed results with that as well, some images ranging from very soft to some being as sharp as single AF select. I will update later as I take it out for more situations. However, with that being said, the camera’s autofocusing with the 28-135mm lens is very quiet, very fast and accurate for the most part especially with using the cameras single AF select mode.

    Battery Life: still on the first charge off the box, taken about 500 test shots and a few seconds of 720p recording, battery life is about halfway.

    ISO performance. Now here is where many have a bone to pick. I am not afraid to use high ISO as my prints rarely go beyond 11×14. More than often I found myself using nothing higher than ISO 1600 on my girlfriend’s 500D/T1i. With the 7D I feel very comfortable using 3200 with about ISO 4000 being my cut off point, that’s where the trade offs between detail and noise will become apparent and start to bother me.

    Overall this camera is a very impressive and I’d give it a rating of about 90/100. It has alot to offer being a HD video DSLR. It’ll provide many rebel users enough room to learn and grow. However, I cant stress enough that if you find yourself needing wide angle capabilities and low light performance, saving up for a full frame, it will definitely be worth the wait in the long run. In fact a few 5D Mark I cameras are available for cheaper than the 7D. Without a doubt this is one of the top crop cameras of the market right now. You won’t regret buying this camera.

    *Update* First of all, I’ve been using the wireless flash with a 430ex II for some portrait photography, it works fine and comes in very handy. Secondly, I’ve finally had a chance to customize all the settings of my camera, READ THE MANUAL! It’s about 250 pages but you’ll need to in order to make the most of your camera. Most of it is the usual, but because this camera offers so many different options, reading the latter pages is a must.
    Firmware release 1.0.9 is out so dont forget to update if you still have 1.0.7.
    For those of you still wondering if the 7D is worth the upgrade or worth buying over a full frame, keep in mind that Canon just release rebates for some EF and EF-S lenses including the 10-22 and 17-55 2.8; as well as some very popular L lenses. So for those of you debating between a 7D and Mark II, getting a kit and using the money saved for a wide angle will pretty much cover all the focal lengths you will really need.

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