Home » Digital SLR Cameras » Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens

Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens

Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens
Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens


Product Added : February 8th, 2013
Category : Digital SLR Cameras

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"This Best Selling Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens Tends to SELL OUT VERY FAST! If this is a MUST HAVE product, be sure to Order Now to avoid disappointment!"

Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens


Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens

The Canon EOS Rebel T2i Digital SLR Kit w/ EF-S/18-135mmf/3.5-5.6 IS incorporates a number of advanced pro-DSLR features in a compact and very affordable camera body. Driven by a DIGIC 4 image processor, the T2i contains a high-resolution 18.0 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, and can capture JPEGs, RAW (14-bit, Canon original), or RAW+JPEG stills at burst-rates of up to 3.7 frames-per-second. The EOS Rebel T2i can also capture full 1080p HD video with monaural sound, or stereo sound when using (optional) 3.5mm external microphones. In addition to the camera’s bright eye-level optical reflex viewfinder, the Rebel T2i also features Advanced Live View (with a dedicated Live view/Movie button) for composing and editing your stills and video using the T2i’s 3.0″ Clear View LCD, which contains a whopping 1.04 million dots of resolving power. Additional image enhancing tools include Auto Lighting Optimizer and Highlight Tone, which further improve detail in the highlight, mid-tone, and shadow are

  • 18.0 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) Sensor and DIGIC 4 Image Processor Offer High Image Quality and Speed
  • ISO 100-6400 (Expandable to 12800) For Shooting From Bright to Dim Light
  • EOS Movie Mode Has Manual Exposure, Expanded Recording Modes, and Improved Sound Quality
  • Enhanced 63-Zone, Dual-Layer Metering System and 9-point AF System
  • Quick Control Screen Button for Easy Access to Frequently Used Settings
  • Wide 3.0-inch (3:2 Aspect Ratio) Clear View LCD Monitor (1.04 Million Dots) for Improved Viewing

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What customers say about Canon EOS Rebel T2i 18 MP CMOS APS-C Sensor DIGIC 4 Image Processor Full-HD Movie Mode Digital SLR Camera and EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS UD Standard Zoom Lens?

  1. 1,670 of 1,693 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    PERFECT!, March 11, 2010
    By 
    G. Argov
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Whether you’re new to the world of DSLRs, or are a seasoned photographer who wants to try your luck at video, the Canon Rebel T2i is perfect. I’ve had nothing but great experiences with it so far, and highly recommend to everyone.

    Other than the T2i, I own (and primarily shoot with) the Rebel XS (1000D), and also have extensive experience with the Canon 50D. While my XS still serves me very well, I wanted to get an SLR with video capabilities since the release of the T1i. After finally saving up enough for the T1i, I really lucked out that Canon announced the T2i, which has even better features! I am lucky enough to finally have it, and want to share my experiences, and how they compare to my expectations
    ==================
    OVERALL IMPRESSIONS
    The camera is very small and light. It is not weather-sealed or as durable as some of the more expensive SLRs, but it doesn’t “feel cheap” in my opinion. It features a 3-inch LCD (compared to the Rebel XS’s 2.5 inch screen), which also has a very high resolution. It looks lovely! Auto-focus is fast, and I’ve been very pleased with the quality of the pictures and videos I’ve taken so far.
    ==================
    PROS
    IMAGE QUALITY: I feared that cramming so many megapixels onto this sensor, there would be a lot of image ‘noise’ (the megapixel myth). This thankfully hasn’t been an issue, and I’ve been very pleased with the pictures taken with this camera! Aside from White Balance issues (see below, Cons), image quality is pretty good!

    VIDEO: Some people have disparagingly said that Video on DSLRs is just a gimmick. I disagree. Based on sample clips I’d seen on YouTube, I was excited about getting an HDSLR, and while videos are sometimes shaky if you don’t have very steady hands, a tripod eliminates those concerns. Audio quality on the T1i was criticized by many, but the T2i has a microphone input jack, which allows you to connect a mic. I don’t yet own one so can’t comment on that feature, but will update this review if and when I save enough to try this feature out. Additionally, this offers improved recording options, including higher fps (frames per second) than the T1i, which technically offered “true HD” recording of 1080, but only at a choppy 20 fps.

    LOW-LIGHT PERFORMANCE: I am much more impressed than I expected. My Rebel XS could go up to ISO 1600, but would perform pretty poorly there. This not only can go up to a significantly higher ISO level, but performs much better. Less image noise means you have to waste less time editing your pics, and many more keepers!

    SDXC SUPPORT: Only own SDHC cards up until now, but it’s great to know that this supports the next generation of flash storage, which means you’ll in the future be able to hold many more pictures than currently available.

    CONS
    NOT A FULL-FRAME SLR: This is not a full-frame SLR like the Canon 5D Mark II, and the APS-C sized sensor results in a crop factor (1.6x), and doesn’t necessarily provide the same image quality as the larger, full-frame sensor does. Still, at less than half the cost of the Mark II, I think this is a trade-off that’s well worth it for most users.

    Crop factor means that this camera, like other Canon DSLRs that have the APS-C size image sensor, will not be true to the lens’s designation. A 50mm lens will produce an image more in line with 50mm x 1.6, or 80mm on a full-frame. This not only makes a difference for those who want to do landscape photography (which usually benefits from wide-angle views), but for those with unsteady hands. The general logic is that to ensure a steady shot, you need to shoot at the reciprocal of your focal length. So for a 50mm focal length, you should be shooting at a speed faster than 1/50 second for a steady shot. Keeping the crop factor in mind, you really should be shooting at a speed faster than 1/80 a second.

    Crop factors are common for most digital SLRs, as full-frame sensors jack up the cost of production, which are then passed on to the consumer in the form of very expensive cameras. So it’s not so much a shortcoming of the Rebel T2i, but just a note to keep in the back of your mind.

    DIFFERENT BATTERY: This is more of a hassle for those who owned spare batteries than for those whose first SLR would be the T2i, but Canon changed the battery. Again, not such a big deal, but might be a hassle for some who find out that their old batteries can’t be used on this model.

    WHITE BALANCE: I found that the ‘Auto’ White-Balance setting was wildly inaccurate on my Rebel XS (often giving indoor shots a yellow tint unless I changed the WB to the ‘Incandescent Light’ mode), and I feel that the WB settings on this model still aren’t as accurate as they should be. If you want truly accurate WB, you can use a gray card, or an alternative would be to simply try digitally editing the photos on your computer after shooting.

    NO…

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  2. 368 of 374 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Great Upgrade (coming from an XSI), April 16, 2010
    By 
    Robert Stone (Midwest / Ohio) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    I just got this camera today (finally an available body only since I have no use for the kit lens) and I am awed. I had done a lot of research on this before buying it so I knew what to expect in terms of both the big upgrade issues as well as the little tweaks they have done, some of which turn out to be really terrific. If you are coming from another Canon the menus and interface will be second nature. Based on another very positive review just posted, coming from Nikon it’s also an easy step. Here are some early observations:

    The Best:
    A huge bump in ISO. This was one of the two main reasons I upgraded from my trusty (and still good) XSI. I have made some test shots and despite going up to an 18 MP sensor the noise is not much of an issue and I shot several pics at ISO 3200 which look quite good. I then shot some in 6400 which did start to show some noise in the low light but still made for serviceable pictures. I am looking forward to seeing what it will do around a campfire at an upcoming camping trip with my daughter! My XSI despite a F/2.8 lens could not do much with that in the past.

    The other main draw for me was video. I dream of being able to bring just one camera to, say, Disney and have it do double duty and I think this one may do it. So far, I have only shot a couple scenes in fairly low light and focus is a bit of a challenge but by zooming in and allowing the camera to come to focus before the shot it is manageable. I expect this to not be as much of an issue in brighter light. Be sure to enable auto focus during video in the menu – I suspect it is disabled by default due to the noise many lenses make with focusing as that would be recorded as well. I have two USM / “L” lenses so that should not be a problem for me but your milage may vary. I also plan to try some manual focusing. Keep in mind that video clips for full 1080P 30 FPS are limited to about 12 minutes – I worried about this a bit until I realized that when I edit my videos shots are rarely longer than 4 minutes (and of that I usually keep just 2 or less). That said, this camera is not the one to choose to record, say, a stage production. For that a dedicated video camera able to record an hour or more at a time is a must.

    The Good:
    Better Live View – Live view mode is now much more accessible and in more modes.

    Sensor Size – 18 MP sensor is nice for cropping and taking full advantage of “L” glass if you have it. Other than that, this is not a major draw from my perspective. I would actually have preferred this be a 12 MP camera allowing low-noise great pics to, say, over 20000 ISO.

    Memory Type – This camera uses SD type cards including the new ultrahigh capacity cards. I know it is a small matter but I like being able to use the cards I have rather than having to but some expensive CF cards (such as used by the 7D). Keep in mind that they recommend Class 6 or higher cards for video (I got a couple 16 GB Class 10 cards for about $40 each which should fit the bill). I’ll use my older cards just for stills.

    Stereo Mic Input – This allows the option of using a better mic than the built in mic. I may never take advantage of that but I suspect I will, actually. Of course, inclusion of a stereo mic would have been even better!

    Misc – A lot of little things about this camera already impress me. For example, they moved the “no flash” setting on the main dial to right next to full auto and my most used setting “portrait” mode and away from the far end since they realized a lot of people use it (that’s according to a video I saw online with a Canon employee). There are a lot of little touches like that which I have already noticed.

    The Bad: (really not so bad in many ways)
    The build quality is not 7D (which I have just handled at a store). The magnesium body on that bad boy just makes it feel very solid and by comparison the T2i does feel not cheap but does feel light. On the other hand less weight is good (especially at places like Disney) and this camera is appropriately being labeled a “baby 7D” in terms of sensor chip, etc. Of course, having an extra $1000 in your pocket (or not on your charge card) is another huge advantage over the 7D.

    It is not a full frame camera. This means there is a “crop factor” due to the chip size which effectively multiplies by 1.6 the focal length of lens you are using (as compared to 35 mm film cameras or full-frame cameras like the 5D Mk II. Since I was coming from an XSI which of course is also a smaller sensor for me there is no transition to make here.

    In summary, I am VERY pleased with this purchase and expect this to be my camera body until my ultimate camera is released (full frame, stereo mic, uses SD cards, useable ISO to >100,000 all for under $1000 – I know, I know this is a pipe dream now but an (old) kid can dream, can’t he?)

    UPDATE: I have had this camera…

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  3. 329 of 341 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent photo camera! Video…hmmm, March 4, 2010
    By 
    Nomad77

    First, I have an extensive background in both photography and video. I was looking for a smaller camera to carry around that could also shoot video. When I heard about this one I thought it would be perfect and it is good, very good BUT its does have its issues… I will try to keep this short and to the point.

    Pros:

    1. Superb image quality in both photos and video.
    You can expect image quality comparable to a Canon Pro DSLR.
    And I am not just saying that. I actually did compare it to our 1Ds MkII.
    This camera can produces usable images up to ISO 3200. Noise is there but they
    do a good job of controlling it. With this said, it would be noted that there
    really isn’t that much difference between a Canon 20D and the most expensive DSLR
    for photos that will be displayed on the web or in regular size prints.
    If you don’t really need video then you can save yourself a lot of money and just
    get a used 20D :) I actually still have my original 20D as a backup.

    2. Amazingly, the 18-55 kit lens turned out to be remarkably good. How good?
    Well, within the center area of the frame it would give the more expensive lens a run for their money :)
    Where it begins to break down is in corner detail but this is to be expected.
    The focusing is also too noisy to use for video, IF you are recording sound.

    UPDATE: if you are looking to upgrade the lens, I can recommended the Canon 15-85 IS.

    3. The built in mic is also very good. Even on regular video cameras this is almost a universal weakness.
    If you are looking for a better mic I can recommend the Rode SVM Stereo Video Mic.
    Works very well with this camera, unlike the Audio Technica 24CM. Its not cheap but good mics never are.
    On all of these cameras hiss is a problem to varying degrees especially when recording in a quiet environment.
    The quiter the source the more you will hear it. The only way to get remove it is to use an external audio
    record like the Zoom H4N or do it in software with something like SoundSoap.

    4. Light weight compared to the higher end Canon bodies.

    5. Amazing low light video capability. With a fast lens f2.8 or lower even a Pro video camera can’t touch it.
    So if shooting in dark places is a big requirement then these cameras are the way to go.

    Cons:

    1. This is my biggest problem. I personally find the small body a lot more difficult to handle than the larger
    Canon cameras we have. Maybe I am just use to the larger bodies but they are a lot more natural and easier
    to work with. If you shoot pro or semi pro get the 7D just for this reason. The battery grip will help.
    I have small hands so I hate to think how it would feel with someone that has large hands. I would highly recommend
    you go somewhere and play with the T2i just to see how it feels in your hands.

    UPDATE: The BG-E8 battery grip makes a big difference in this regard!

    2. For my personal taste I find the T2i to over expose a bit. This could be related to the Peripheral Illumination
    Correction, Highlight Priority, etc. I usually just under expose by 1/3 of a stop to compensate for this.

    3. My 2nd big disappointment is the video. The video quality is superb this is not the issue. Where the problem lies
    is in actually using the camera as a video camera. It has two big problems in this regard: the manual zoom and lack
    of auto focus. It is practically impossible to hold the camera steady and do a smooth zoom in or out. Panning and zooming
    at the same time is almost impossible. A regular video camera have electronic zoom controls that allows you to zoom
    in and out very smoothly. The other problem is lack of auto focus. Sure you can refocus manually but again very difficult
    to hold the camera steady and focus. Using the camera auto focus in video mode is possible but its really slow and
    the mic will pick up the noise from the lens as it hunts for the focus. For me, this means, the camera is more useful
    for recording short video clips not a full video shoot e.g. shooting a whole wedding. I don’t feel it can replace a regular
    video camera as yet. For example, if you are thinking of using this camera to shoot your kids running around, it can do it,
    but there will be a lot of out of focus parts because it cannot track a subject like a regular video camera can and you
    won’t be able to adjust the focus quickly enough either.

    UPDATE: the video can work for the most part, IF you shoot with the intent of editing the final video. A SLR will require
    a bit more post production work than a regular video camera but the video quality will be superior. It works more like
    a professional film camera they use in movies than the video…

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