Home » Digital SLR Cameras » Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)

Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)

Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)
Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)


Product Added : February 5th, 2013
Category : Digital SLR Cameras

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Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)


Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)

Don’t let life pass you buy. Get the fast action that other cameras miss thanks to Sony’s Quick AF Live View. Take in the landscape with 3D Sweep Panorama mode.1 See into the dark with Handheld Twilight and Multi-Frame NR modes. And preserve your memories with amazing Full HD 1080i movies.

  • 16.2 megapixels with Sony’s Exmor HD APS sensor
  • 1080/60i Full HD movies2-the same as many networks
  • Image layering: Multi-Frame NR & Hand-held Twilight
  • Auto HDR captures more contrast than one exposure can

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What customers say about Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)?

  1. 166 of 169 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The best non-pro DSLR just got better!, December 21, 2010
    By 
    Tim Naff “Tim” (Huntsville, AL USA) –
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black) (Electronics)

    Short version: this is easily the most sophisticated pro-sumer dslr on the planet. (*Amendment: The A77 now assumes that title, with the caveat that the A77 isn’t really a DSLR.) It has a set of features that make it easier to take great pictures in the most challenging circumstances. This review is for the camera with the kit lens. The lens is a compromise: the body and moving parts are essentially all lightweight plastic. I even noticed some plastic-on-plastic chatter when zooming in and out. But Sony knew that their (pre-A77) flagship pro-sumer camera (the A700 was getting long in the tooth) had better perform well, so they put the money in the optics. I tested this lens against five others using eye-charts at 20 feet, and guess what? It was in the upper third of the heap in center sharpness in its zoom range, and it was in company that costs roughly 5X the extra money you pay for it over the camera body price. It is exactly what Sony intended it to be: a great place to start, and a good-enough place to stay. Now for the longer version of the review.

    Long version:
    When Sony bought the Mind of Minolta, melded it with the minds of one of the world’s leading multi-media companies, and backed it with Sony financial muscle, good things started happening for digital photography. Sony corporate revenue is 10 times that of Nikon and Canon put together, and when Sony shows up, they come to play. I have had an A550 for over a year, but on careful reading of specs and the A580 owner’s manual, I decided to upgrade. The DSLR innovations from Sony are beginning to snowball. This camera, prior to the A77, was ahead of every other camera on the planet in three areas that are critical to non-professionals:

    1. low light performance – it is excellent out to ISO 6400 (Pros care about this too and it beats the A77 in my own tests.) *Amendment: The word on the street is that Sony is now selling this camera’s sensor to Nikon for use in the D5100.

    2. fast-focusing live view with tilt screen, which is slightly better than several other Sony offerings and beats all other brands like a drum (the A77 has a more degrees of tilting freedom and focuses just as fast)

    3. high dynamic range (HDR) feature, which, for stationary subjects, will bring images out of the shadows with full detail, grain-free, like you won’t believe (the A77 also has this)

    The A580 has multi-frame noise reduction (MFNR), which will REALLY help out in low light as long as the scene is stationary. Of course, using a long exposure on a tripod also requires that the scene is stationary. MFNR is a selection on the ISO menu, so the camera will optimize the ISO according to the scene. I’ve become very dependent on this feature when working in a hurry in low light. I set it as a memory preset so I can get in and out of the mode with just a twist of the knob.

    The A580/560 has added the video capability that the A550/500 lacked. It shoots 1080/60i, which deinterlaces in a 1080p TV to become 1080/30p and is technically better than what you get from the high-def movie standard of 1080/24p, but is not up to the 1080p/60p of the most recent video cams. It can be very, very sharp according to your optics and your success at focusing. The A580/560 does not focus during video shooting like the A77/65/55/35 SLTs, but it does something that they do not: it allows you to choose the lens aperture f-number. (Higher f-number means a more closed down aperture, means more of your scene in focus, and means you may need more light when you take advantage of it.) The A580 allows manual focus while shooting, but that’s awkward without a tripod. On the A580/560, you can zoom while you shoot, but you can’t change the aperture while shooting. (The manual is extremely confusing on that point.) With the A580/560, you set up your focus and your f-number before you start shooting. (Use aperture priority and press your still-photography shutter halfway to set the focus.) Then you press the video button, and focus stays fixed until you stop shooting video and change it (unless you adjust manually). Given that this is an APS-C sensor, you should be able to get enough depth of focus to cover most – but not all – circumstances. If you need a lot of your scene in focus at once, the A580/560 is preferable; if you need to follow a objects as they move a lot closer or a lot further away, the SLTs are your best bet. Both designs, unlike the A77, will have a heating problem if you shoot video continuously for more than a few minutes, which most of us rarely do. What I’ve done with video has looked very sharp. When shooting video, you can’t use the optical viewfinder.

    The A580/560 has done away with two of the three most-significant negatives that I had identified for the A550/500. The only one left is lack of program shift, although there is a very useful manual-mode shift, which…

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  2. 12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Very happy with this camera, June 26, 2011
    By 
    Niko B “Niko B” (Florida) –
    This review is from: Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black) (Electronics)

    I previously was using a Pentax K20d body and owned a Nikon D70 and still own a Lumix G1. If you are not familiar with the K20d, it’s an excellent enthusiast level camera with pretty much every feature and control you could want. But it is a 2008 model so I wanted to upgrade into the ever changing new technology. The Pentax, like other older cameras is not quite as good at high ISO, low light shots as I would like so I took the chance and made the switch.

    The Sony arrived quickly with pretty much what I expected in the box. In looking it over and initial testing, the first thing I noticed was the things that were missing as compared to the K20. I won’t try to list the physical differences other than to say the A580 vs the Pentax K20d differences are fairly typical of the differences between many enthusiast cameras when compared to mid-level models (Canon d50 vs T3i, Nikon D7000 vs D5100, etc). The Sony A580 has some of the frequently used functions tucked into the menu rather than having physical controls such as white balance, drive mode, raw, etc. as the Pentax has. At first I was horrified. I told myself, relax, it’s Amazon, you can send it back. I then decided to give the Sony a chance and took a look at the manual. I found that Sony has at least put a quick menu button on the back which brings up pretty much all the things you need to the top level of that menu. I thought, ok, it’s better than my pocket cam. Another thing I noticed is that some features that the Pentax has buried in menus are brought to the surface with buttons … ie..a Normal/DRO/HDR button, and a movie record button. It was starting to get interesting.

    The final straw came when I took the camera outside for a night shot test (it was late night now). It just happens that there was an opportunity for a shot that I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to get for months with the K20. Its my cat walking on the landing rail in low light. The poor Pentax K20 just isn’t fast enough .. even with my f1.8 50mm lens at ISO 1600 .. the moving cat was blurred and the level of noise was unacceptable. Well here I had that same shot in front of me. The A580 was set to the “Night View” scene mode. I aimed using live view and shot .. I was shocked! The result was exactly what I wanted. I exhaled and told myself, there is no way I am sending this baby back to Amazon. I uploaded the photo to the item description area.
    Here I am a month later having dedicated some time to learning the camera. I am extremely pleased with it. It is certainly a different animal than your standard XSi, D80, K7 camera .. you have to learn to take advantage of the mind blowing features like the super DRO mode, HDR, and scene modes but this camera will take photos that are very difficult to get with previous cameras. It is especially good with low light photos with high tech features only Sony offers. The image quality is excellent even at high ISOs. (it’s the same 16MP sensor that the Nikon D7000 uses). I am not really big on movies but the HD movie quality is excellent in my view. Even the PMB software that comes with it is very nice.

    I give this camera my full recommendation for a camera under $1000 … and actually I had been considering the Nikon D7000 but now I am glad I bought the Sony A580 instead for half the price. I’ll spend the savings on a nice lens.

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  3. 5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Sony A580 – Best Camera I Have Ever Had, January 6, 2011
    By 
    Jerry K. “Jerry” (California Central Coast) –
    This review is from: Sony DSLRA580L 580 DSLR Camera and DT 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 Lens (Black) (Electronics)

    It would be easier to write this review by stating that I agree 100% with the review above this. I have had the camera about a week and still learning all of the settings – which for a novice takes quite awhile. If you do get this camera – and you should – also get Gary Friedman’s Book on the A580. It’s packed with almost 500 pages (the online book) of everything you need to know about this camera and photography in general.

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